Pygmalion theme

pygmalion theme of society and class

In contrast, relations between people of opposite genders are generally portrayed by Shaw as antagonistic. From his unusual standpoint of being committed to a celibate marriage, Shaw apparently feels free to denounce marriage as an exchange of sexuality for money similar to prostitution even though this was not happening in his own marriage.

Theme of appearance and reality in pygmalion

They lack the counters necessary for the game. Science is called on as the transformative power, in this case, phonetics, the science of speech. He points out the differences between the educated scholars, Pickering and himself, and the life of the dirty flower girl, Eliza. This means more than a mere distinction between rich and poor. A servant is suddenly discovered to be the long-lost son of a duke. Education is shown throughout the play when the theme is introduced, developed and concluded through the thoughts, actions and decisions of the characters. Pygmalion created a sculpture of a perfect woman and fell in love with it; after he prayed, Aphrodite brought it to life for him. He swears or behaves however he pleases, making rude remarks.

This means more than a mere distinction between rich and poor. Pygmalion created a sculpture of a perfect woman and fell in love with it; after he prayed, Aphrodite brought it to life for him. Shaw in some sense pits their intellectual intelligence against the wits of others, like Eliza. This statue is named Galatea, and it is represented in Shaw's play by Liza.

pygmalion theme of transformation

He of course has nothing to lose since he has money, fame, and position. Shaw makes clear that transformation of the flower girl is not the stuff of myth, but a necessary part of modern life, where social justice is part of the ongoing process of human history.

pygmalion myth theme

He is lower class but understands how the game is played and disdains to take part. She declares that she was less degraded as a flower-seller than as a "genteel" lady trying to make an appropriate marriage--because as a flower-seller, at least, she wasn't selling her body.

There were ways of rising to a higher class, through education, money, or marriage, but those were exceptions.

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Pygmalion : Theme