Community rural nursing

Special attention needs to be paid to the recruitment, retention, and support of nurses in Aboriginal communities, as well as to ways in which continuity of care and culturally appropriate care can be provided.

Methods A cross-sectional survey used a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up to achieve a stratified systematic sample of regulated nurses from all provinces and territories, living outside of the commuting zones of large urban centers and in the north of Canada.

Community rural nursing

In general, the findings of this study suggest that rural and remote nursing practice is more complex and multi-faceted than it is usually thought to be. Nurses were more likely to plan to leave if they were responsible for advanced decisions or practice, if they were required to be on call, or if they were working in a remote community.

rural hospital nursing

They also have more difficulty obtaining additional clinical and academic qualifications. In Canada, as elsewhere, persistent challenges in ensuring a well-qualified nursing workforce in rural and remote communities have impacted health services and patient outcomes [ 26 — 10 ].

Rural nursing practice

Another distinction is that nurses working in rural areas do not have the opportunities to specialize as easily as their urban and suburban counterparts, according to Juliar. Implications for future research include the need to address data gaps to facilitate workforce planning and to evaluate the effectiveness of provincial recruitment and retention strategies in the rural context. Significance level was set at 0. Remote and northern places are included in the Rural and Small Town definition [ 40 ]. The conceptual framework was created by the Research Team based on an integrated view of workforce planning [ 36 ] and reflected the interconnectedness of individual, workplace, community characteristics, and nursing practice in rural and remote settings. In general, the findings of this study suggest that rural and remote nursing practice is more complex and multi-faceted than it is usually thought to be. Registered nurses RNs and nurse practitioners NPs practice in all ten provinces and three territories. Government policies focussing on the retention of clinical expertise, the recruitment of new graduates and expanding the role of registered practical nurses have been more difficult to implement in the rural setting. The purpose of this article is to describe the study methods and examine the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions.

The purpose was to describe the nature of nursing work from the perspective of rural nurse executives and frontline nurses.

Individual satisfaction levels also predicted intent to leave.

Nursing website

This method of sampling preserved randomness but provided a sample with greater distribution across the geographical region than simple random sampling would have done. In small communities, nurses' personal and professional roles are inseparable. The lower numbers of rural registered nurses who have acquired further academic qualifications suggest that new ways of working with rural nurses and their employers need to be explored in order to make advanced education opportunities relevant and accessible. Yet they also felt that organizational changes significantly increased their administrative responsibilities and limited their opportunities for communication with frontline nurses. Abstract Background In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. Rural nurses have higher demands placed on them by small communities that typically depend on a single nurse to meet all of their health needs. What are their roles and functions? The survey and reminders were mailed to the participants by either their nursing association or the Research Hub at the University of Northern British Columbia. In this article, the study methods are described along with an examination of the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions. Additionally, they have significantly fewer clinical resource supports, with clinical and administrative leaders often located some distance away.

Autonomy is another benefit of working in a rural setting, according to Bette A. Yet they also felt that organizational changes significantly increased their administrative responsibilities and limited their opportunities for communication with frontline nurses.

This study describes the rural and remote registered nursing workforce and the nature of their practice.

community health nursing in rural areas
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Weighing the pros and cons of rural nursing