Battle royale analysis

Battle royale cast

This is particularly relevant to the two characters: Mitsuko Shibasaki Ko who murders many of her fellow female students for revenge, and Kazuo Ando Masanobu an exchange student who is the only character who willingly signs up for the game. The law sounds like the most entertaining reality show never made: Every year, a random class is rounded up on a deserted island and forced to slaughter each other until one person remains. Advertisement Some might be surprised to learn that the late Fukasaku was 70 years old when he directed Battle Royale, and it was a triumphant return to form for a filmmaker who built his career on super-stylish and often campy yakuza movies and youth pictures from the late '60s and early '70s, like Black Lizard, Battles Without Honor And Humanity, Blackmail Is My Life, and If You Were Young: Rage. He even recites algebra before firing his gun in an attempt to kill off his fellow students. Suddenly, enemies have license to resolve their grievances with extreme prejudice, and the bonds of even the closest friendships are tested. At one point, director Kinji Fukasaku gave a press statement directed at the age group of the film's characters, saying "you can sneak in, and I encourage you to do so. However, there does seem to be a level of understanding between his character and that of Noriko. In this infamous and deeply ironic scene, the peaceful accord reached by a group of girlfriends holed up in a lighthouse gets tested when one of them decides to play saboteur: Advertisement Battle Royale isn't perfect: The repeated flashbacks are often hasty, expository shortcuts; the plot muddies up a bit in the final third; and some of the day-for-night photography looks pale and amateurish. The most overt influence being the blockbuster film franchise The Hunger Games which has mirrored Battle Royale's dystopian social justice system but has expanded it into themes of differences in social status and class rather than divides in generational values. In the end, even the villains fall victim to this oppressive government regime and modern ethos on the Japanese school system. So the bigwigs got together and passed this law: Battle Royale. However, to advance into the higher grades and post-secondary education, students must compete for placement through nationwide examinations, particularly for the more prestigious schools. Framing the film with recognizable western classical music keeps the viewer subconsciously aware of that fact. Elephant this ain't. Kitano enacts the same violence on Nobu by stabbing him, but then utilizing his injured state to show the rest of the students what the necklaces around their necks are used for.

Images courtesy of Toei Co. This is particularly relevant to the two characters: Mitsuko Shibasaki Ko who murders many of her fellow female students for revenge, and Kazuo Ando Masanobu an exchange student who is the only character who willingly signs up for the game.

Some approach the game with enthusiasm, determined to come out on top at any cost, while others gleefully see the game as a means to settle old scores, such as with the snobbish clique that had ridiculed them in the past.

Others view it as a criticism of the Japanese educational systemsuch as the issues of school violence and its failings to prepare students for the extremely competitive Japanese employment market that favors elitismin which students must partake in fiercely competitive nationwide examinations in order to secure a spot into the more distinguished universities, as these will guarantee student placement into better careers.

For the uninitiated, schooling in Japan is broken into nine compulsory grades, which are publicly funded, and the upper-secondary and post-secondary levels, in which the private sector plays a significant role. Some students form alliances to sue for peace and an end to the game, while others join forces to try and stop the bloodshed by hacking into the systems that monitor the game.

But in moving into its main premise, the film wastes no time in showing the children just how helpless they truly are in a world controlled by adults.

battle royale dystopia

However, despite the narrative shortcomings of the script, the subtext of the story is loud and clear.

Rated 8/10 based on 101 review
Download
An Analysis of Kinji Fukasaku’s Battle Royale